Trio No. 3
From the Bottom of the Soul
(26972593)-1
String Quartet No. 3
Escondido

 

Gad Avrahami (b. 1952)
Julia Gomelskaya (b. 1964)

Andres Ferrari Gutierrez (b. 1971)

Seppo Pohjola (b. 1965)

Stefano Scodanibbio (b. 1956)

 

Trio No. 3

Trio No. 3 work has a serious and expressive nature that uses the deep sonority of the ensemble. The music is about a brutal "event" that one might overcome, only by repression of its meaning. The focusing on the memory of it, through a form of art - music, is used as a mechanism of understanding. The piece is structured in sections that are built in five main parts.

Part I (mm. 1-54) is a long introduction that exposes the listener to the grave mood of the piece. Part II (mm. 55-98) introduces the brutal aspect. Section 8 is not a linear development - it is rather an episode. Part III (mm. 125-163), in which the cello plays an important role, combines "resigning pain" with brutality. Part IV (mm. 164-189) is focusing on the brutal "event". At the end of this part the cello expresses humanity and a cry against violence. Part V (mm. 190-230) is a coda composed of elements that appeared before, and a short quotation from Alban Berg's Wozzeck. This quotation from one of the most humane pieces of music is combined with the "human cry" that forms a very important element in the piece.

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Gad Avrahami (b. 1952)

Born in Kibbutz Shamir, Gad Avrahami studied composition with Prof L. Schidlowski at the Rubin Academy of Music in Tel Aviv University where he received his MA degree in Composition.

Avrahami's works have been performed in Israel by the Hifa Symphony Orchestra, the Ramat Gan Chamber Orchestra and the Anchor Choir and the Kibbutz Chamber Orchestra, which produced a CD with his piece Chamber Music. His chamber works have also been performed at the Voice of Music Festival in the Upper Galilea, Music Events at Tabgha, in Groningen, Holland, and Dusseldorf and Keiserslautern in Germany. Avrahami's music has also been broadcasted by radios in Israel, Holland and Germany. In March 2000 his piece Trio No. 3 for Bass Clarinet, Cello & Piano was performed at the Bianale of new music "Tempus Fugit", in Tel Aviv, Israel.

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From the Bottom of the Soul

...behind the threshold of closed eyes - the pulsed space. The whirl of Feelings... Bitterness... Pain... The shout of silence. Somewhere in the profundity - the lost sound is in the stillness...

... I am sliding down along the reflection of thought. The touch of losses. Perturbation. The burden of the understanding. The life is the immortal instant between long birth and long death. The bottom of soul is covered by silence. The quietness is more dense than sound. I am pushing off. The movement of inspiration is deprived of depression... I am coming back to the eyes - through them - to the opposite real world... Emptiness... Solitude... The found-out sound is the interlaceness of the sunny rays on the eyelashes...

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Julia Gomelskaya (b. 1964)

Julia Gomelskaya studied with Prof O. Krasotov at Odessa State Conservatoire (Ukraine) and taught composition there upon graduation in 1991. She won first prize in the Ukrainian National Composers' Competition (1993) and third prize in the International Women Composers' Competition (Ukraine, 1995). In 1995 she was awarded a fellowship by the Guildhall School of Music and Drama (London), and received the MMus Postgraduate Degree in Composition with distinction under Prof R. Saxton (City University of London). Whilst at GSMD she won all six composition prizes including the Lutoslawski Prize. Two of her pieces have been published by GSMD as a compulsory element of the audition process.

Her compositions have been published by GSMD (UK) and Duma Music Inc. (USA) and her recordings were broadcasted on the BBC Radio3 and the New European Radio. Her commissions include the ballet Jane Eyre for the London Children's Ballet; string quartet From the Bottom of the Soul for the Spitalfields Festival 97 (London); Waiting for Sarah Walker and Malcolm Martineau; The Divine Sarah opera-scene for the Mayfield Festival 2000; Zig-Net-Zag and Seven Touches for the Ensemble Klangheimlich; and New Work for wind orchestra for the GSMD Festival 2001 (London).

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(26972593)-1

This string quartet was composed in 1999. It is a rhythmic work based on the theory of prime numbers. The title of this composition refers to the highest prime number discovered when this work was beginning.

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Andres Ferrari Gutierrez (b. 1971)

Andres Ferrari Gutierrez was born in the city of Concepcion. When he was 11 years old he started studying piano privately. In 1990 he entered the Bach Society in 1990 to further his piano studies with Professor Cecilia Chiang and music theory with pianist Mario Alarc6n. He moved to Santiago in 1992 to enter the University of Chile to get a degree with a Licentiate in Music Theory under the master Mr Claudio Acevedo. In 1996 he began his course of studies for the Composition Licentiate in the same college, studying with Aliocha Solovera, Cirilo Vila, Juan Amenabar, Juan Lemman, Eduardo Caceres, Miguel Letelier and Mr Rolando Cori, among others. He graduated in 1999 and was accepted as a member of the Composers National Association (ANC) and the Chilean Copyrights Society (SCD). He is presently working on his thesis and dictates classes at the University of Chile Faculty of Arts.

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String Quartet No. 3

"I seem to write string quartets at turning points in my career as a composer. The first string quartet was completed in spring 1991 after a sterile period lasting four years. I look upon it as my true debut as a composer. The second string quartet was the last work before the crisis of 1995-1999, while the third string quartet was the first to be written after the crisis. It was the start of my present stage, which seems to be marked by a considerable rise in productivity at least. In my programme note to the first performance I stressed the carefree, sunny nature of the third string quartet. This was a conscious attitude. I had decided that composing should be fun for a change. I wanted to avoid trying too hard.

"The third string quartet lasts about a quarter of an hour and is performed without a break though the individual sections are clearly marked off. The walking-bass type tread of the opening gives way to wild outbursts of scales. Amid the frenzied rushing about are a couple of tranquil spots of fundamental importance in which the harmony becomes particularly consonant."

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Seppo Pohjola (b. 1965)

Seppo Pohjola is one of the most striking and idiosyncratic representatives of the generation of composers which emerged in the 1990s. His music is characterized by the modernist spirit and post-Serialist techniques that reflect the style of the Korvat auki! (Ears Open!) Society in the 1980s, but he also makes use of free-tonal elements and clearly defined melody and rhythm.

Pohjola's output has enjoyed a large number of performances in Finland and abroad. Stylistic proliferation has brought bold strokes, Minimalist figurations, an urban jazz pulse and incisive drama to Pohjola's idiom. He has taken new influences liberally onboard and integrated them into his own brand of musical narrative. Pohjola's latest works include String Quartet No. 3 (2000), Tralala (2000) for orchestra and Liebelei (2001) for chamber orchestra.

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Escondido

Escondido ("hidden" in Spanish) belongs to a cycle of six pieces written for the six possible duo combinations of the four strings (violin, viola, cello and contrabass) and is the most melodic. Semi tonal and quart tonal lines are used until the introduction of an Indian scale, which is derived from the foregoing material.

As in all my music the dialectic between real sound and harmonic sound is the base of the whole work and specifically in the double stops of the long central section.

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Stefano Scodanibbio (b. 1956)

Stefano Scodanibblo, contrabass soloist and composer, was born in Macerata, Italy. In the 1980s and 1990s his name has been prominently linked to the renaissance of the double bass, playing in the major festivals throughout the world dozens of works written especially for him by such composers as Bussotti, Donatoni, Estrada, Ferneyhough, Frith, Globokar, Sciarrino, and Xenakis. He has created new techniques extending the colours and range of the double bass heretofore thought impossible on this instrument. In 1987, in Rome, he performed a four hours non-stop marathon playing 28 pieces by 25 composers.

He collaborated for a long time with Luigi Nono and Giacinto Scelsi, and John Cage commented that he has not "heard better double bass playing than Scodanibbio's." Of particular importance is his collaboration with Terry Riley and Edoardo Sanguineti. In 1983 he founded the "Rassegna di Nuova Musica," New Music Festival held every year in Macerata, Italy.

He regularly plays in Duo with Rohan de Saram. Since 1996 he has been teaching contrabass at the Darmstadt Ferienkurse. He has recorded for Montaigne Auvidis, col legno, New Albion, Dischi di Angelica, and Ricordi.

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